Ryan is the village green preservation society

nprbooks:

Libraries in many big cities often serve as de facto homeless shelters — a place for people living on the streets to find quiet and warmth — and it can make others, there to just check out books or videos, uncomfortable. 
KQED’s Scott Shafer reports that’s why the San Francisco Public Library has hired a full-time social worker. She spends her days roaming the library floors, keeping an eye out for regulars who look like they could use her help. And sometimes she hires the formerly homeless patrons she’s helped, like Joe Bank, to do outreach under her supervision.

nprbooks:

Libraries in many big cities often serve as de facto homeless shelters — a place for people living on the streets to find quiet and warmth — and it can make others, there to just check out books or videos, uncomfortable.

KQED’s Scott Shafer reports that’s why the San Francisco Public Library has hired a full-time social worker. She spends her days roaming the library floors, keeping an eye out for regulars who look like they could use her help. And sometimes she hires the formerly homeless patrons she’s helped, like Joe Bank, to do outreach under her supervision.

(via beethousand)

theatlantic:

Mad Men: Is This the Woman Who Can Save Don Draper?

Dissecting “A Day’s Work,” the second episode of the seventh season
Read more. [Image: AMC]


Now I am not going to rail against great television.  I think great television is indeed art and warrants “dissection.”  But at what point do we draw the line and stop dissecting every piece of modern TV that has a “great” sheen applied to it by the current standards of our culture?  Is Mad Men truly great or just really interesting soap opera?  I mean, if it’s great, awesome.  So Breaking Bad, Walking Dead, American Horror Story, Game of Thrones, etc etc etc are all great?  I love that you like these shows, Atlantic writers, and I understand that you’re responding to their popular appeal.  Awesome.  But for God’s sake do we need to do an episode-by-episode breakdown of every “great” modern television show?
And I know that people are asking for it.  People also ask for Fox News.  
/soapbox

theatlantic:

Mad Men: Is This the Woman Who Can Save Don Draper?

Dissecting “A Day’s Work,” the second episode of the seventh season

Read more. [Image: AMC]

Now I am not going to rail against great television.  I think great television is indeed art and warrants “dissection.”  But at what point do we draw the line and stop dissecting every piece of modern TV that has a “great” sheen applied to it by the current standards of our culture?  Is Mad Men truly great or just really interesting soap opera?  I mean, if it’s great, awesome.  So Breaking Bad, Walking Dead, American Horror Story, Game of Thrones, etc etc etc are all great?  

I love that you like these shows, Atlantic writers, and I understand that you’re responding to their popular appeal.  Awesome.  But for God’s sake do we need to do an episode-by-episode breakdown of every “great” modern television show?

And I know that people are asking for it.  People also ask for Fox News.  

/soapbox

diversityinya:

REMINDER: TODAY IS THE LAST DAY TO ENTER!

diversityinya:

To celebrate the (approximate) 1-year anniversary of Diversity in YA’s launch on tumblr, we’re giving away all these books! Thank you for celebrating diversity in young adult books with us and continuing to engage in dialogue and increasing awareness!

(To view a document listing all the titles, click here.)

Here’s how this is going to work:

  1. We’ve divided these books into 4-packs of diverse awesomeness. Don’t worry, series titles will all be kept together, so you won’t end up getting a middle book or a third book in a trilogy without the others.
  2. We have multiple copies of some titles, so some of them will go into several prize packs.
  3. We’ll select 17 winners, each of whom will receive a prize pack of 4 books!
  4. Because of the large number of titles and the cost of international shipping, we’re only able to ship to U.S. mailing addresses. International folks may enter as long as they have a U.S. mailing address.
  5. Teachers and librarians get an extra entry!
  6. The deadline to enter is March 31, 2014.

Enter here:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

(If you can’t see the Rafflecopter entry form on your tumblr dash, you can also enter at our website.)

Thank you so much to the following publishers for donating books to our Anniversary Giveaway:

(via heartlandfemme)

al-val:

When you put someone who is scared of black kids, who is distrustful of black kids and doesn’t want to understand black kids in a room with black kids, they’re not going to try teaching them, they’re going to try controlling them.

That’s that.

Malcolm [X] was one of the most beautiful and one of the most gentle men I met in all my life. He asked the boy a question which I now present to you: If you are a citizen, why do you have to fight for your civil rights? If you’re fighting for your civil rights, that means you’re not a citizen. In fact, the legality of this country has never had anything to do with its former slaves. We are still governed by the slave codes.

—James Baldwin on Malcolm X, 1979. (via floricanto-desnuda)

(Source: c-span.org, via al-val)